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Poster: gdoyer Date: Oct 30, 2009 6:57am
Forum: etree Subject: Converting DAT

I have some very good DAT recording that I would like to convert to FLAC/MP3 etc. What is the best way to go about this. The DAT player I am using is a home version with both analog and digital outs. I would prefer to usethe digital outs. I have both desktop and laptop computers. What I need to know what is a good soundcard and software combination to use.

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Poster: mtnjellyfish Date: Oct 31, 2009 5:14am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Converting DAT

You may find more help at taperssection.com

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Poster: Mosquito Date: Oct 31, 2009 2:04am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Converting DAT

There may be some reference info here on archive.org for you, but I don't know where it'd be. Sorry.

--

Unfortunately there are lots of decent-to-good-to-excellent options out there.

These are prolly some good places to start (even though I don't know how up-to-date they are):

For the process: http://www.etree.org/faq_dat-cdr.html

For software, see the sidebar here: http://www.etree.org/software.html

For hardware, again there's a lot out there. (This will be blasphemous, but...) If you *just* want to get it into your computer and quality isn't as important as cost, just do analogue out from the DAT to analogue in with whatever sound hardware your computer already has.

If you want a proper / good transfer, I'd suggest getting a small (two channel) FireWire or USB interface unit *that has the same digital interconnect as your DAT drive* (i.e. one of the S/PDIF or AES/EBU forms, there are multiple for each) and supports your sample & bit rates (e.g. 48 kHz/16 bit or, say, 32 kHz/12 bit). If you're unsure of what you have find the manual and/or specs from the manufacturer.

The products by Edirol (Roland) and M-Audio will generally be seen as 'at least decently good enough' and can serve as good places to start as you begin comparing features:

http://www.rolandus.com/products/productlist.php?ParentId=114
http://www.m-audio.com/index.php?do=products.family&;ID=recording <-- you'll have to copy/paste this URL and remove the semicolon

It'll probably be a good idea to buy from someone that has a good / easy return policy just in case your interface unit doesn't actually work with your DAT drive.

GL

This post was modified by Mosquito on 2009-10-31 08:57:49

This post was modified by Mosquito on 2009-10-31 08:59:07

This post was modified by Mosquito on 2009-10-31 09:04:58

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or Staffgreenone Date: Nov 2, 2009 6:57am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Converting DAT

I will second the taperssection.com recommendation, especially the Computer Recording forum. For what it's worth, I believe the Roland products all resample the incoming bitstream so that may not be the best for your needs.

M-Audio makes good products but I used the predecessor to ESI's U24 XL for all my DAT transfers, and it treated me great. It's tiny, very portable, would work with either your desktop or laptop, and has both optical AND coax inputs. Runs about $95 on Amazon. Check it out: http://www.esi-audio.com/products/u24xl/

As for software, if you're just going to do fades and tracking, Audacity is free and does the job just fine.

This post was modified by greenone on 2009-11-02 14:57:29

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Poster: Mosquito Date: Nov 2, 2009 11:24am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Converting DAT

--> " For what it's worth, I believe the Roland products all resample the incoming bitstream..."

Oooh. I hadn't heard that, Good to know they might.

If they do, I would definitely stay away. FWIW, I didn't recommend taperssection.com 'cause I was afraid of an overwhelming answer to what sounded like a simple question. But, sure, if you really want to know, jump in with both feet and learn what you really need to know to get a good transfer. :)